Part 3 – Challenges with respect to Collection of PPP Basket of Goods

Currently the status in BC is that higher population regions, cities and towns have curbside blue bin collection, where either city or contracted vehicles collect and aggregate the materials to a processing facility. In many remote regions and towns the accepted collection method for residential recycling seems to be centralized community depot points, where either civic or private collectors service the depots and aggregate the material to the nearest processing facility. In many rural regions in BC local entrepreneurs have also stepped into residential collection services, by providing “user pay” garbage and recycling collection for residents. In high population density ...

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Part 2 – Communication is going to present challenges with PPP EPR

In my view there are several communication priorities that will have to be tackled with PPP EPR.  Some of the priorities must include: What is the goal? Is it 75% diversion of the aggregate or 75% of each of the individual grades of PPP? Clear and open discussions with the PPP stakeholders, including municipalities, private recycling businesses that provide collection, processing and marketing of PPP products now, non-profits, the public, and of course the producers themselves. Communications with the public on the plan and changes, how to sort, what to include etc.   Achieving 75% diversion from landfill is a lofty ...

Part 1 – Background to Extended Producer Responsiblity Challenges in BC

In British Columbia, Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) for Printed Paper & Packaging (PPP) is driven by the producer’s obligation to achieve 75% diversion of the PPP that they sell into the Province.  To further elaborate, this obligation was created in May of 2011 when the BC Recycling Regulation was updated to include printed paper & packaging.  I have tried to translate what this obligation really means: Translation …obligation means that the producer will pay for 100% of the costs associated with recycling PPP in BC. Translation…producers will be mandated to get 75% of their product recovered and sent to a viable ...

Extended Producer Responsibility might not be our waste saviour …

Everyone is banking on Extended Producer Responsiblity as being the way to save ourselves from mountains of garbage in BC and in other jurisdictions.   I have heard lots of arguments for and against transfering the cost of collection, recycling and marketing of products to the producers. I do believe that fundementally it makes sense and EPR could drive packaging improvements (less waste), reduce costs by streamlining services and collection and theoretically more product will help drive innovative uses for the product collected.  Did I mention “could”? For me it is a big, could. My fear is that EPR will not ...

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